Strawberries Must Die

strawberry blossom
strawberry blossom

I’ve been ignoring the wild strawberries that grow here and there in some of the wilder spots in my yard for years, but they are taking over.  They love to leap across my mulch with their runners and establish whole new colonies in the flower beds.  They attract birds; good news, who poop out the seeds and spread them even further, bad news.  I probably will never be able to completely kill them off.  This is about the benefits of losing the battle.  It’s all about things that are out of their place.  Most of us call them weeds.  Some of us look the other way and hope the neighbors understand.

The next three pictures are from my lawn.  Bugleweed is actually a bigger problem, if these things are a problem to you, but it’s not open yet.  You can see a tight bud mixed in the shot of the blue violets.

violets in the lawn
violets in the lawn

 

white violets in the lawn
white violets in the lawn

Chrysogonum, the garden friend who gave it to me admitted it was a little invasive.

Chrysogonum
Chrysogonum

Then I moved on to the neighbors.

I thought these were violets with an upright habit until I got close.  Phlox?  That’s my best guess because they were growing in the lawn near the pink phlox below

 

unknown
unknown
unknown and violets in the grass
unknown and violets in the grass
pink phlox
pink phlox
weeds
weeds
out of place iris
out of place iris

 

 

This is not a weed but definately out of place.  Friends suggest I can blame the gardener.

Good plan.

 

Canolli wishes she could work with me in the garden but I signed a contract that she and sister would be indoor cats.  And we have coyotes.

 

 

she believes she's in the wrong place
she believes she’s in the wrong place

 

One thought on “Strawberries Must Die”

  1. Garden friends tell me that small upright flowers are bluets. I thought they would be blue, but evidently, many are white.
    And the yellow weed filling in along the road is Chelidonium majus.

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